Where Does Jesus Say “I Am God”?

Instead of coming to earth announcing his deity with trumpets blaring, Jesus was born in a lowly stable. Instead of parading around the hills of Galilee proclaiming his deity, Jesus healed the sick, fed the hungry and taught us to love one another. Instead of destroying his enemies, Jesus willingly let them crucify him on a wooden cross in order that our sins could be forgiven. Jesus said his mission was to “seek and save the lost,” not boast of his own greatness. He set the example of humility for us.

Yet, Jesus did say “I am God” on several occasions. [Read more…]

Does Christianity Teach Three Gods or One God?

The Bible clearly speaks of one God in both Old and New Testaments. In a clear emphatic declaration, God tells us in Isaiah:

I alone am God. There is no other God—there never has been, and there never will be. I, yes I, am the LORD, and there is no other Savior.

Isaiah 43:10b, 11, NLT

So, are Christians blaspheming God when they teach that Jesus Christ is God in the flesh? [Read more…]

Did the Apostles Teach that Jesus is the Creator Written of in Genesis?

In Genesis, the God of the Bible is revealed as Creator of everything from the tiny atom to the magnitude of space with its billions of galaxies. Thus, it would have been heresy for a Jew to think an angel or any other created being was the Creator. Isaiah confirms that God (Yahweh) is the Creator:

“This is what the Lord, the Creator and Holy One of Israel says…I am the one who made the earth and created people to live on it. With my hands I stretched out the heavens. All the millions of stars are at my command….I, the LORD Almighty, have spoken!” (Isaiah 45:11a, 12, 13b)

Did the Apostles Teach that Jesus Is the Creator Written of in Genesis?
[Read more…]

Why Would God Need to Come to Earth in Human Form?

What is Christmas really all about?  According to the Bible, man’s rebellion has created a wall of separation between God and us (see Isaiah 59:2). In the Scriptures, “separation” means spiritual death. And spiritual death means being completely separated from the light and life of God.

The Bible calls this disobedience sin, which means “missing the mark,” like an archer missing his intended target. Thus our sins have broken God’s intended relationship with us. Using the archer’s example, we have missed the mark when it comes to the purpose we were created for.

“But wait a minute,” you might say. “Didn’t God know all of that before He made us? Why didn’t He see that His plan was doomed for failure?” Of course, an all-knowing God would realize that we would rebel and sin. In fact, it is our failure that makes His plan so mind-blowing. This brings us to the reason that God came to Earth in human form. And even more incredible-—the remarkable reason for his death. [Read more…]

Can the New Testament Be Used as Evidence for Jesus’ Existence?

Skeptics like Ellen Johnson, past president of American Atheists, dismiss the New Testament as evidence for Jesus, calling it “biased.” However, even most non-Christian historians consider ancient New Testament manuscripts as solid evidence for Jesus’ existence.

Cambridge historian Michael Grant, an atheist, argues that the New Testament should be considered as evidence in the same way as other ancient history. [Read more…]

Proof in a Jar

What if the Christian scribes who copied scrolls of Isaiah and the other Old Testament prophetic books altered them to make them correspond to Jesus’ life?

This is a question many scholars and skeptics have asked. And it seems possible, even plausible at first glance. It would prevent us from making Jesus into a lying imposter, which seems highly unlikely, and it would explain the amazing accuracy of his fulfillment of prophecies. So, how do we know that the Old Testament prophetic books, such as Isaiah, Daniel, and Micah, were written hundreds of years before Christ, as purported? And if they were, how do we know Christians didn’t alter the texts later? [Read more…]

Why Did Jesus Call Himself the Son of Man?

Some people argue that Jesus’ reference to himself as the “Son of Man,” proves he didn’t claim deity.

However, theologian J.I. Packer explains that the name “Son of Man” referred to Jesus’ role as Savior-King, fulfilling Isaiah’s depiction of the Messiah as both the suffering Savior¹ and the coming King where he is called, “The Mighty God,” “The Everlasting Father,” The Prince of Peace.”²

During his trial before Caiaphas, the high priest, Jesus referred to himself as the “Son of Man” foretold by the prophet Daniel. Caiaphas ordered Jesus, “I demand in the name of the living God—tell us if you are the Messiah, the Son of God.” [Read more…]

How Would the Accuracy of Biblical Prophets Compare to Today’s Psychics?

According to the Scriptures, the God of the Hebrews spoke to his people through prophets, men and women who were especially attuned to God and who may or may not have been a part of the religious establishment. Some of the prophets’ messages were for the present; others, for the future. Either way, their role was to proclaim God’s declarations and disclosures to the people. [Read more…]

What Did Jesus Mean When He Called Himself the “Son of God”?

Jesus claimed to be the “Son of God.” This title does not mean Jesus is God’s biological Son. Neither does the term “Son” imply inferiority anymore than a human son is inferior in essence to his father. A son shares his father’s DNA, and although he is different, they are both men. Scholars say that the term “Son of God” in the original languages refers to likeness, or “of the same order.” Jesus meant by it that he has divine essence, or in 21st century terms, the “DNA of God.” [Read more…]

Did Constantine Invent the Christian Doctrine of Jesus’ Divinity?

In the centuries prior to Constantine’s reign over the Roman Empire, Christians had been severely persecuted. But then, while entrenched in warfare, Constantine reported to have seen a bright image of a cross in the sky inscribed with the words “Conquer by this.” He marched into battle under the sign of the cross and took control of the empire.

Constantine’s apparent conversion to Christianity was a watershed in church history. Rome became a Christian empire. For the first time in nearly 300 years it was relatively safe, and even cool, to be a Christian.

No longer were Christians persecuted for their faith. Constantine then sought to unify his Eastern and Western Empires, which had been badly divided by schisms, sects, and cults, centering mostly around the issue of Jesus Christ’s identity.

These are some of the kernels of truth author Dan Brown uses in The Da Vinci Code, and kernels of truth are a prerequisite for any successful conspiracy theory. But the book’s plot turns Constantine into a conspirator. So let’s address a key question raised by Brown’s theory:  did Constantine invent the Christian doctrine of Jesus’ divinity? [Read more…]